All posts by Deb Sherrer

Nurturing Independent practice

glory of the snow

Today in our Monday’ morning, gentle vinyasa class, we explored creating a short practice utilizing tools from basic mindfulness and the Vajra Yoga sequence by Jill Satterfield.

When entering a short (or longer practice), it is beneficial to start by settling the body into an upright and relaxed seated posture or coming into Shavasana. Ask yourself: “Where am I starting from? What is arising in the present moment?” Then you can ‘investigate with kindness’ the arising sensations, emotions, thoughts, breath quality, as they are present and shifting.

Once you have investigated this for a couple of minutes, choose to let your attention rest on the flow of natural breath or engage a simple pranayama of choice (e.g., add-a-little breath technique (let the inhale get slightly fuller than natural breath flow and relax the breath out on the exhale) or Ujjayi breath, etc.

Consider ‘skillful means’ as you approach your practice. Skillful means is choosing to engage in poses and breathing practices, etc. that serve what is present on any given day. Listening intuitively to how energized versus tired you may be, can both guide your practice choices, as well as nurture your attunement to the ongoing feedback and dialogue that is always occurring on the edge of our attention and/or consciousness.

The Vajra sequence can be found in the graphic below. This sequence can be used for a short practice and/or interwoven near the beginning of a class. It is helpful for waking up the whole body and opening the hips before entering standing poses. In this graphic, the spinal rock sequence is offered as a gentle warm-up before the Vajra sequence.

To Harbor or release

“Humbly, we are asked to keep the flow real between what is taken in and what is let out. We have only to breathe to remember our place as a living inlet. Experience in, feelings out. Surprise and challenge in, heartache and joy out. In a constant tide, life rushes in, and in constant release, we must let it all run back off. For this is how the earth was made magnificent by the sea and how humankind is carved upright, again and again, by the ocean spirit that sets us free.”

~Mark Nepo, The Book of Awakening

resources to consider: changing habits, breathing practices for wellness, & healing grief

Here are some resources on: the neuroscience of habit formation and cessation (spoiler alert: It’s not about willpower!), the power of breathing practices to support wellness , and the importance of deep presence when meeting grief.

An excerpt from Proper Breathing Brings Better Health, in Scientific American, By Christophe André on January 15, 2019

MIND UNDER THE INFLUENCE

“Even a rudimentary understanding of physiology helps to explain why controlled breathing can induce relaxation. Everyone knows that emotions affect the body. When you are happy, for instance, the corners of your mouth turn up automatically, and the edges of your eyes crinkle in a characteristic expression. Similarly, when you are feeling calm and safe, at rest, or engaged in a pleasant social exchange, your breathing slows and deepens. You are under the influence of the parasympathetic nervous system, which produces a relaxing effect. Conversely, when you are feeling frightened, in pain, or tense and uncomfortable, your breathing speeds up and becomes shallower. The sympathetic nervous system, which is responsible for the body’s various reactions to stress, is now activated. Less well known is that the effects also occur in the opposite direction: the state of the body affects emotions. Studies show that when your face smiles, your brain reacts in kind—you experience more pleasant emotions. Breathing, in particular, has a special power over the mind.”

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/proper-breathing-brings-better-health/

Megan Devine, a psychotherapist and creator of Refuge in Grief and author of, It’s OK That You’re Not OK: Meeting Grief and Loss in a Culture That Doesn’t Understand, narrates this animation on the importance of presence when grieving.

Yoga As A Mindfulness Practice: Embodied integrity

the embrace

From where I sit, the wind is turning the sunlight on the ocean into rippling, silver streamers. Waves closer to the shore lap lightly, while the streamers flicker and swish. The evergreen and rock of Mouse Island on the horizon is an anchor, a landing, in this moving sea of light. All the ingredients are here for contentment, joy, even bliss. There is nowhere else to be, nothing else to do.

Rachael Naomi Remen, the pediatrician-turned-therapist and author wrote: “Our bodies hold us to our integrity.” She knew this personally, as someone who was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease as a teenager and still completed the rigorous demands of medical school, including sleep-deprived residencies. Over subsequent decades, Remen navigated multiple surgeries and medications that often resulted in further complications as she aged. Thankfully, her overall experience with Crohn’s appeared to become more manageable.

As a teacher of general and therapeutic yoga, I have experienced professionally and personally how our bodies, our somatic experiences, hold us to our integrity. We know on a sensory level things it can take minutes or years to acknowledge, repair, or integrate on a cognitive or rational level. Some of what we know lives deep in our bones and/or tissues, below or beyond words. It is an embodied wisdom, a wholeness, that is always accessible to us.

Yoga, as a mindfulness practice, helps us to listen deeply to the nuance and the obvious; it connects us to our physical narratives. The consistent practice of mindfulness, of returning to body, breath, and the present moment, aids us in becoming evermore attuned to the experiences arising in our whole being, enhancing our capacities for self-soothing, self-awareness, and compassion. The deepening of these skills will also serve us off the yoga mat or meditation cushion, whether we are meeting adversity, nurturing relationships, or connecting with the simple joy and beauty of the natural world. This is the integrity, the homecoming, the freedom of embodied presence.

Stephen Cope’s Riding The wave technique: BRFWA

let the spaciousness of the sky be a gentle reminder of the spaciousness of breath

This is a mindful, self-regulation practice that can support our capacities to meet the present moment with skillfulness and compassion, and in the process cultivate equanimity.

Stephen Cope
(Excerpts and technique* from Yoga and The Quest for True Self)
Riding the Wave Technique:

Breathe:
Soften the belly and bring your awareness to the breath. The body responds immediately. The wave of breath begins to flow into all parts of the body.
Relax:
Full breathing automatically initiates relaxation. In order to deepen this effect, it can be useful to coach yourself. “Relax.” You can consciously relax the muscles: The face. The brow. The belly.
Feel:
Actively begin to investigate the wave of feeling generated by this relaxation. Where in your body do you feel sensation, energy, movement? Investigate. Move toward the sensations and feelings, rather than away from them. If intensity is present, meet it with breath and attention toward the grounding energy or points in the body.
Watch:
As you begin to settle, you may be able to notice the capacity to witness your experience, to be the observer. Allow yourself to identify with the observing self. The Witness stands at the center of experience, and is able to be with the experience, the sensation, the feeling, and not be overwhelmed by it or practice this capacity.
Allow:
Coach yourself to allow the wave of feeling to wash through you. No need to block anything. It’s all safe. It will not destroy or annihilate you. It will not hurt others. Practicing staying with your true experience just as it is. Watching it begin, shift, and end.

Note: If a lot of intensity is present, you can modify this instruction to allow and invite calming, soothing breath awareness and the gentle reminder: present moment, safe moment.

“When we are judging or criticizing our experience, we cannot be fully in it. In order to witness we have to be able to interact with what is, without needing to fight against it. Nothing has to get rejected or closed down. No part of me is any more right than any other part. I am not more invested in one than in the other. I am curious. Accepting. Allowing. Interested. Watching…There is an essential corollary to the first law of the witness, however. It goes like this: Eventually, we will react, we will judge, we will censor. But this is not a problem either! When we do react, judge, or censor, we can simply take that reaction as the object of the witness’s attention.” Stephen Cope

Consider ending practice with this gift of a poem by Wendell Berry:

What We Need Is Here

Geese appear high over us,
pass, and the sky closes.
Abandon, as in love or sleep, holds
them to their way, clear
in the ancient faith: what we need
is here. And we pray, not
for new earth or heaven, but to be
quiet in heart, and in eye,
clear. What we need is here.

Mindfulness Practices for Stress Reduction and Self-Care in Uncertain Times

Stressed out? Worried? Frustrated? Feel like it’s difficult to plan ahead? You are so normal. Even five to ten minutes of mindfulness or simple breathing practices can help. Really.

Below are the links for a webinar-Zoom presentation and the related Power Point requested by and offered to the Vermont Association of Area Agencies on Aging (V4A) on May 15, 2020 to support direct service professionals coping with the heightened stress of the pandemic. The presentation offers fundamental mindfulness concepts, skills, and practices that can support individuals with daily self-regulation and self-care.

Watch the Zoom presentation here.